Bill Waters ~~ Haiku

Haiku + Tanka, Haibun, Rengay, Shahai, & More

Archive for the month “October, 2020”

Early autumn

early autumn

all night long

the crickets


Published in Cold Moon Journal, 10/19/20.

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Croaking crow

croaking crow:

you scold me as if

I were to blame,

as if I were the cause

of your hidden sorrow


Published in Cold Moon Journal, 10/15/20.

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The Amazing Pumpkin Carve 2020, part 2

Carloads of visitors file past 40 huge sculpted pumpkins.

Carloads of visitors file past 41 huge sculpted pumpkins at dusk at Woolsey Park, Hopewell Township, New Jersey. Photo courtesy of NJ.com.

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade — or in the case of the 2020 Amazing Pumpkin Carve, turn a walk-around event into a drive-thru!  :- D

Public poetry had a place at The Amazing Pumpkin Carve again this year in the form of six “gravestones” I made, complete with epitaphs. Many thanks to the Hopewell Valley Arts Council for including them! They were placed near the entry of “Pumpkin Row” and looked appropriately spooky — especially at night.

A row of gravestone-shaped poem-signs.

Gravestone Row. Photo by Bill Waters.

(For a little information on how I made the poem-signs, you can go back in time a few days to The Amazing Pumpkin Carve 2020, part 1, if you wish.)

The gravestone of Simon Grimm.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

The gravestone of Benjamin Jolly.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

The gravestone of Ezekiel Green.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

The gravestone of Nelson Burns.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

The gravestone of Prudence Jones.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

The gravestone of Agnes Olde-Yung.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

After the gravestones came a haunted house,…

A haunted house facade.

Home NOT sweet home! Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

…the “welcoming committee”,…

A tableau of friendly(?) skeletons.

Come on in! It’s a helluva show! Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

…and then the pumpkins themselves! Here are just a few that caught my eye:

A sculpture called Pumpkin King, by Lori Johannson.

Pumpkin King, by Lori Johannson. Photo courtesy of NJ.com.

A pumpkin called The Moon, by Anne Nixon-Ellery.

The Moon, by Anne Nixon-Ellery. Photo courtesy of NJ.com.

A pumpkin called Epidemic, by MattDerby.

Epidemic, by Matt Derby. Photo by Bill Waters.

A pumpkin called Peering Pumpkin.

Peering Pumpkin, by Curtis May. Photo courtesy of Nancy Waters.

Kudos to the Arts Council for bringing some outdoor fun to Central New Jersey during a year notable — alas! — for many cancelled cultural events! The final tally showed that more than 2,500 carloads of people viewed this amazing display!


Hopewell Valley Arts Council: https://www.hvartscouncil.org

Poetry in Public Places Project: https://www.facebook.com/groups/PoetryInPublicPlacesProject/

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Advertisement

Bones of the earth

The renowned Chicago Botanic Garden is composed of dozens of expansive gardens and sprawling natural areas.
 
[It] opened more than 45 years ago as a beautiful place to visit, and it has matured into one of the world’s great living museums and conservation science centers. Every year, more than one million people visit the Garden, [which is] uniquely situated on 385 acres on and around nine islands, with six miles of lake shoreline.
 
Currently on view in the Japanese-themed garden are 10 haiku-signs, and one of them contains a poem by me:
 
 
Poetry in a peaceful natural setting: a welcome respite from the worries of a trouble-laden year!  :- )
 

More about the Chicago Botanic Garden: https://www.chicagobotanic.org/info.

More about the Japanese-themed garden: https://www.chicagobotanic.org/gardens/japanese.

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The Amazing Pumpkin Carve 2020, part 1

Due to COVID-19, the Hopewell Valley Arts Council is presenting this year’s Amazing Pumpkin Carve — a fall festival in Central New Jersey featuring dozens of fanciful hundred-pound pumpkins — as a drive-thru. How clever is that?  :- D

Last year ten of my haiku and senryu provided a touch of public poetry on yard signs. This time around, I’ve created six oversized gravestone-shaped signs bearing epitaphs in the manner of days gone by. Here are photos of them that I took at home before bringing them to the fairground to be set up. I hope you enjoy them (if “enjoy” is the right word for gravestones… LOL!- ).

After writing the epitaphs, I designed the signs using online software at Staples.com and had them printed on 3′-by-2′ corrugated plastic.

Next, I trimmed the top of each sign into a gravestone-y shape with X-acto knives. (It wasn’t super-difficult, but it *was* time-consuming. LOL!- )

Finally, I took a printout of an image I found of a “flying skull” grave rubbing to a local Staples and had it laser-copied onto weatherproof vinyl label material. I cut out the stickers, applied them to the signs, and voila!

I guess I owe Staples — both online and bricks-and-mortar — a big debt of gratitude! ;- )


Hopewell Valley Arts Council: https://www.hvartscouncil.org

Poetry in Public Places Project: https://www.facebook.com/groups/PoetryInPublicPlacesProject/

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